Immigration Bond & Criminal Offenses

If Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has arrested or detained you, you may be eligible to request a bond hearing in front of an Immigration Judge.  The lowest amount of bond that will be granted in Immigration Court is $1,500.00 and the maximum amount could be as much as $20,000.00.  In order to be granted bond, you must convince the Immigration Judge that you are not a danger to the community and you are not a flight risk.

How do I prove that I am not a danger to the community?

Proving that you are not a danger to the community is often a more difficult task in immigration court than in state criminal court.  Any arrests, including misdemeanor arrests, could affect your ability to convince the Immigration Judge that you are not a danger to the community.  If you have a criminal record and you are requesting immigration bond, your first step should be to collect your police reports and court docket sheets.  After you collect these documents, it is important that you have an Immigration Attorney interpret your police reports and court dockets to determine whether you should apply for a bond motion.

How do I prove that I am not a flight risk?

 To prove to the Immigration Judge that you are not a flight risk, you must prove that you will return to court on your court date.  One way to substantiate this prong of your bond motion is to prove to the Immigration Judge that you have a viable form of immigration relief available.  Another effective option is to include letters of support in your bond motion.  Your close family members, friends, and community members should write a letter of support on your behalf.  If a relative or friend is willing to post your bond, your argument may be strengthened, as the Immigration Judge may be more inclined to believe that you have strong ties to the community given a community member’s willingness to provide you with substantial financial support.

It is important that you speak with an Immigration Attorney before you or a loved one petitions the Immigration Judge for bond because you only have one opportunity to petition for bond.  There is one exception to this rule.  If you can prove to the Immigration Judge that your circumstances have changed significantly since your first bond hearing.  However, this is not an easy argument to win, so it is important that you are thoroughly prepared when you initially petition the Immigration Judge to be released on immigration bond.  Contact Amara Immigration Law, LLC today at info@amaralaw.com to schedule an appointment with our Boston Immigration Attorney.

info@amaralaw.com  •  617-505-1010

A Greater Boston Immigration & Criminal Defense Law Firm